Rhyming Poems

Couplet

Triplet Quatrain
 

Bound verse is poetry based on metrical pattern. It has a predictable pattern of rhyme, foot, and meter. Two important parts of a metrical pattern are foot and meter. A poetic foot is a group of two or three syllables. A poetic meter is the number of poetic feet put together in a line.

 

(Paul Revere) (drove his horse) (so hard) (its tail) (flew in) (the air).

(I had) (two parrots) (one good) (one bad).

 


A couplet is one form of bound verse. It has two rhyming lines with about the same number of poetic feet in each line. Usually, a couplet's content is something silly. It has no title.


The rhyming words in bound verse follow set patterns. These patterns are marked by the letters of the alphabet starting with A. Example:

Take my nice, new shiny nickel (A) 4 feet
Sell me that juicy, garlic pickle! (A) 4 feet

 

Examples:

Silver jet soars across the sky
Just like a giant butterfly

 

Sally has a bandage on her nose
She didn't know the door was closed!

 

Student Examples:

Click on thumbnails to view the entire poem.

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A triplet, or tercet, is another form of bound verse. It contains three lines of poetry, usually rhyming, with about the same number of poetic feet in each line. It has a title.


The rhyming words in bound verse follow set patterns. These patterns are marked by the letters of the alphabet starting with A. Example:

Awakening

The presents that you bring (A)
Are not only just for me (B)
Because you brought the spring. (A)

 

Example:

Scared

Creak, squeak, bump in the night
I wake up in such a fright
I jump up to turn on the light!

Student Examples:

Click on thumbnails to view the entire poem.

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A quatrain is a poem written in four, rhymed lines following a set pattern. They follow any one of four rhyme patterns (AABB, ABAB, ABBA, or ABCB). The poem usually has about the same number of poetic feet in each line. When quatrains are part of a longer poem, each group is called a stanza or "paragraph".  There is a title if the quatrain stands alone.


The rhyming words in bound verse follow set patterns. These patterns are marked by the letters of the alphabet starting with A. Example:

The lizard

The lizard is a timid thing (A)
That cannot dance or fly or sing; (A)
He hunts for bugs beneath the floor (B)
And longs to be a dinosaur. (B)

 

Example:

The rainbow

A rainbow plays in the water spray
It hides in a chandelier.
It always seems to find its way

Through the glass when light is near.

 

Student Examples:

Click on thumbnails to view the entire poem.

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back to Poetry Project back to Slough

LuAnn Slough and students, Manassas City Public Schools